National Clinician Scholars Program

National Clinician

Scholars Program

2019-21 Fellows

Scholars by Year

Katherine Chen

Katherine Chen

Dr. Katherine Chen is an internal medicine physician who is interested in the interactions between population health, health disparities, and city planning. Dr. Chen graduated magna cum laude from Yale University with a bachelor's degree in biology. She obtained her medical degree at UCLA, where she was awarded the Geffen Scholarship. During her residency training in internal medicine at UCLA, she implemented and evaluated an innovative team model for primary care education and was twice awarded a Commendation for Excellence in Medical Student Teaching. She has also led and participated in a variety of community-based projects, investigating a church-based exercise program for low-income women, urban agriculture as a solution to food deserts in Los Angeles, and physician-led behavior change counseling for diabetes. In her current role as Outpatient Chief Resident and clinical instructor at UCLA, she helps oversee the quality improvement and population health curriculum for residents.

Career Interests: Dr. Chen aspires to help cities combat structural inequality by studying the ways in which thoughtful urban planning can advance health equity and promote individual and community well-being. She plans to combine her research career with clinical work as a primary care physician.

Research Interests: Dr. Chen’s research interests include the effects of urban planning and public policy on population health. By applying methods in geographic information systems (GIS) and community-based participatory research, she hopes to understand how neighborhood development can drive or mitigate health disparities in populations vulnerable to displacement.

Nichole Goodsmith

Nichole Goodsmith

Dr. Nichole Goodsmith is Chief Resident of Community and Global Psychiatry in the adult psychiatry residency at the UCLA Semel Institute. She obtained her BA in Biochemistry from Columbia University before spending three years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Burkina Faso, West Africa. She then completed joint MD-PhD degrees at Cornell University, with doctoral studies focused on Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis. Her interests in public health and the structural and social determinants of health eventually led her from infectious diseases to psychiatry, and from basic science to health services research. Dr. Goodsmith has a strong interest in program development, having developed and directed a range of programs throughout her training, from a social services referral center at Harlem Hospital as an undergraduate, to comprehensive residency tracks in Community Psychiatry and Global Mental Health for UCLA psychiatry residents. She has been recognized for her work with several awards including the American College of Psychiatrists Laughlin Fellowship and the American Psychiatric Association Public Psychiatry Fellowship.

Career Interests: Dr. Goodsmith plans for a career that will combine mental health services development, research, and policy impacting under-resourced populations in the United States and globally. She is particularly interested in innovative approaches to disrupt the cycles of homelessness, trauma, and incarceration faced by many individuals with serious mental illness.

Research Interests: As a Scholar, Dr. Goodsmith is interested in evaluating interventions to improve outcomes for justice-involved individuals with serious mental illness. Additional areas of interest include collaborative care and task-shifting in the delivery of mental health services, and approaches to reduce disparities in access to mental health care.

Kimon Ioannides

Kimon Ioannides

Dr. Kimon L.H. Ioannides is an Emergency Medicine resident at Temple University Hospital, a high-volume safety net trauma center in North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Mathematics with a minor in Economics at Stanford University, and subsequently served as a certified ninth grade mathematics teacher through Teach for America in New Orleans. He completed the post-baccalaureate pre-medical program at Bryn Mawr College, and then attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, where he additionally obtained a certificate in medical education, was inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society, won the Stolley Award for Global Health Research in Botswana, and the Moskowitz Prize and Goodman Award for clinical research. Dr. Ioannides was honored as a National Outstanding Medical Student by ACEP and the winner of the Resident Research competition for the Journal of Emergency Medicine, where he now serves as peer reviewer.

Career Interests: Dr. Ioannides is interested in improving the quality of clinical emergency care for underserved populations, particularly disadvantaged, psychiatric, and substance dependent patients.

Research Interests: Dr. Ioannides has published on natural experiments, unintended consequences, and other applications of econometrics and causal inference to clinical questions using large observational data sets. As a scholar, he will examine ways to assess and mitigate the impact on healthcare of machine learning algorithms, which may mimic the biases of humans or be poorly validated on marginalized populations, so that artificial intelligence can ultimately narrow rather than widen health disparities.

Adrienne Martinez

Adrienne Martinez

Adrienne Martinez is a PhD candidate at the UCLA School of Nursing, a Registered Nurse and Certified Public Health Nurse. She earned her undergraduate degree in Women's Studies from UCLA and her MSN in Clinical Nurse Leadership from Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU). She was awarded the 2018-2019 UCLA Dissertation Year Fellowship, 2016-2018 UCLA Graduate Research Mentorship, 2017 LA National Association of Hispanic Nurses Scholarship; 2014-2016 UCLA Chancellor's Award; and 2014 John A. Hartford Scholarship. While studying at CDU, Adrienne was selected as a UCLA/CDU NIH Bridges Scholar and Advancement of Gerontological Nursing Science Scholar. She currently serves as the 2018-2020 CDU Alumni Association Chair. As an Albert Schweitzer Fellow-for-Life, Adrienne created a public art-focused service project in a predominantly Latino, Southern California community exploring chronic illness self-care, and preventive health behaviors among Latina older adult women living with type 2 diabetes. Her dissertation study: Simultaneous Experiences of Type 2 Diabetes and Mood or Anxiety Disorder Symptoms Among Latina Women 60+ adds to our understanding of systemic (external) barriers to treatment faced by this population and internal factors that may be informing how these aging women of color experience care delivery systems.

Career Interests: Adrienne's career goal is to become an NIH-funded, tenure-track professor engaged in policy-relevant, patient-centered research that enables the design of cost- and clinically-effective algorithms promoting equity and mitigating existing physical and mental health disparities in the US.

Research Interests: As an NCSP Scholar, Adrienne will continue her exploration of how chronic illness care is experienced by Latino and African American older adults living with co-occurring physical and mental illness.

Elizabeth Moore

Elizabeth Moore

Dr. Elizabeth Moore is a Resident in Psychiatry at UCLA. She received her undergraduate degree in Human Evolutionary Biology with a minor in Health Policy from Harvard University. After college, she worked as a health policy consultant at Avalere Health in Washington, DC. Here, she developed content expertise in Health Information Technology and worked with clients that included professional societies and health systems. She attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was awarded the Kenneth E. Appel award in recognition of her interest in human behavior and devotion to patient care. More recently, as a Resident Informaticist, she created and disseminated informatics tools that led to a significant improvement in psychiatric screening in the primary care setting at UCLA. Also during residency, she developed a well-being program for trainees at a homeless clinic at the VA and pursued research aimed at better understanding the needs of people experiencing homelessness.

Career Interests: Dr. Moore plans for a career that combines policy analysis, health services research, health system innovation, and clinical care. In particular, she hopes to pursue health system redesign, informatics initiatives, and social services/housing partnerships that improve access to mental health care while minimizing provider burnout.

Research Interests: Dr. Moore is interested in studying the impact of primary care interventions and informatics tools on access to mental health care. She is also interested in investigating health care delivery for people who are homeless and who suffer from mental illness and/or substance use disorders.

Carlos Irwin Oronce

Carlos Irwin Oronce

Dr. Carlos Irwin Oronce is an internal medicine resident at the University of Rochester Medical Center. He completed his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry with a minor in Asian Pacific American Studies at the University of Virginia. Afterwards, Carlos was an AmeriCorps volunteer at a Philadelphia community health center. He went on to receive his MD and MPH at Tulane University where he was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. During medical school, he was the recipient of the Jules B. Puschett, MD Award for Professionalism and Dedication to Patients and the MD/MPH Award for Student Excellence. As a resident, Carlos helped develop an interdisciplinary health equity and disparities curriculum for trainees. He has previously worked at the Center for Health Systems Research at Denver Health, where he studied primary care redesign and neighborhood variation in depression.

Career Interests: Dr. Oronce is interested in understanding the effects of health reform and payment policy on marginalized communities and safety net health systems. He is specifically interested in alternative payment models in Medicaid, cross-sector partnerships addressing the social determinants of health, and the use of neighborhood-level data for population health improvement.

Research Interests: Dr. Oronce plans to pursue a career at the intersection of academic medicine, health services research, and health policy. His long-term goal is to partner with communities in the design and implementation of health care interventions, payment policy, and quality measurement programs to address health disparities.

Jacob Quinton

Jacob Quinton

Dr. Jacob Quinton is a primary care internist and graduate of the Yale Primary Care (Internal Medicine) program which he graduated with a distinction in Quality Improvement and Physician Leadership and led the Yale New Haven Hospital Resident and Fellow Senate Advocacy Council, serving as it's founding chair and senior chair. He grew up in rural Washington state, playing basketball and learning the nuances of dry land farming before atttending Gonzaga University, graduating with a BA in Chemistry. He staffed a Catholic Charities low-impact drop-in shelter for 1 year after graduation as an Americorps volunteer, then served as a Teach For America Corps member in New Orleans for two years before attending Louisiana State University Health Science Center - New Orleans for medical school, and Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine for a Masters in Public Health. During medical school he was an Albert Schweitzer Fellow and his fellowship project founded the New Orleans Adolescent Reproductive Health Partnership (NOARHP), teaching evidence based reproductive health education to his former students. He also founded the New Orleans Student Hotspotting program and served on Louisiana's American Medical Association (AMA) delegation. In residency, he's participated in the American College of Physicians (ACP) Council of Residents and Fellows (CRFM) and will serve next year as chair-elect, and chair the year following, as well as beginning a 3 year term as part of the ACP AMA delegation.

Career Interests: He plans a career as a primary care internist, policy-maker, and health care administrator looking to bend the health care delivery system towards equity, efficiency, and value.

Research Interests: Dr. Quinton's research interests revolve around exploring the evolving field of high-needs high-cost care and the evaluation of the Medicaid demonstration projects in order to ensure dissemination of effective models of care. He also has interest in the Veteran's Health administration and focuses on the mortality risk indexes in use to optimize the resource allocation they determine.

Alisha Ranadive

Alisha Ranadive

Dr. Alisha Ranadive is a chief pediatric resident at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital. She completed a BS in Biology at Brown University and an MD at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. During medical training, Alisha was selected as a Chicago Area Schweitzer Fellow, leading her to complete a year-long service project at an elementary school in Chicago. In 2014, she was inducted to the Gold Humanism Honor Society as a 4th year medical student based on demonstrated excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. In addition, she was one of two graduating medical students in 2015 awarded the Urban Health Strongin Community Service Prize. During residency, Alisha volunteered with Seeds to Plate Nutrition Education Class at Mark Twain Elementary in Los Angeles, where she helped design and teach an original lesson on healthy eating and exercise for middle school students as part of an extracurricular nutrition program. She currently serves as the Chair of the Pediatric Resident Diversity Committee at UCLA. In addition, she was recently elected to to the North Westwood Neighborhood Council, where she serves as Chair of the Elections Committee.

Career Interests: Dr. Ranadive is interested in academic medicine and community pediatrics, with a focus on underserved populations. She hopes to work on projects that can inform policy and legislation to improve the delivery of pediatric care.

Research Interests: Dr. Ranadive is interested in investigating disparities in the identification and management of developmental delays and the ensuing impact on school readiness.

Hafifa Shabaik

Hafifa Shabaik

Dr. Hafifa Shabaik is a registered nurse with a background in community health, currently serving as Quality Measures Specialist RN and coordinator for the Medication-Assisted Treatment and Hepatitis C Treatment programs of an outpatient clinic aimed to address health disparities in underserved rural communities of Kumeyaay Indian Nation. Dr. Shabaik received her undergraduate degree in Community Health Education from California State University, Long Beach and entered the field of nursing through the Master of Science in Nursing program at Charles R. Drew University. Dr. Shabaik obtained her doctorate degree at the University of California, Los Angeles where she conducted her dissertation on exploring sociocultural factors to preventive health and cancer screening in resettled refugee women. This research was supported by the UCLA Cota V. Robles Fellowship and the T32 Fellowship in Vulnerable Populations Research.

Career Interests: Independent researcher in addressing the health disparities of minority populations; to increase the diversity of academic nurses from historically underrepresented backgrounds.

Research Interests: The social determinants of migrant and women's health, specifically the social and cultural contexts of vulnerable populations; examining resilience and the long-term health outcomes of resettled refugees; and population health interventions engaging “unseen patients” in accessing preventive health services.

Rivfka Shenoy

Rivfka Shenoy

Dr. Rivfka Shenoy is a general surgery resident at UCLA. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Washington University in St. Louis, graduating summa cum laude and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa with a major in Neuroscience (Biology Track). She earned her medical degree from New York University, as a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. At NYU she helped form and contribute to a large GI Surgical Oncology collaborative, which has yielded progress in both adrenocortical carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma research. Dr. Shenoy was born and raised in Portland, OR and has an interest in Indian dance forms and hiking.

Career Interests: Dr. Shenoy hopes to establish a career as an academic surgeon with focus on health-outcomes research. Clinically, she plans to pursue an expertise in pediatric surgery.

Research Interests: Her research interests include examining the use of narcotics used in the perioperative settings. Her goals are to understand how to decrease excess prescriptions through prescription standardization and patient and physician education. She hopes to gain a deeper perspective into the decision-making processes used for prescribing habits. She has been awarded the 2018 Gerald S Levey Surgical Award Grant for her proposed study.

2017-19 Fellows

Liza Buchbinder

Liza Buchbinder

Liza Buchbinder (VA/UCLA Scholar) is an internal medicine physician from Los Angeles, California. She went to Barnard College for undergraduate and majored in biology. After college, she went to Togo, West Africa, and did the Peace Corps for two years prior to starting medical school at UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program. During medical training, she completed a PhD in medical anthropology from UC Berkeley and UCSF. Her dissertation focused on the limits of naming violence against adolescent domestic servants through the rights discourse on child trafficking and called for an alternative framework to address child labor exploitation in West Africa. She completed her internal medicine residence at UCLA Oliveview.

Career Interests: She plans a career as an academic internist and anthropologist within the field of social medicine, providing care to vulnerable and underserved populations, including a combination of ethnographic research, medical education, and advocacy.

Research Interests: Dr. Buchbinder's research interests include human trafficking within the United States and the disparate ways in which trafficking victims interface directly and indirectly with local hospitals, clinics, and the correctional health facilities. She is also interested in the greying California prison population and the experiences of released elderly prisoners as they navigate the safety net health system to manage chronic illnesses, as well as the ways in which compassionate release programs reflect on contemporary attitudes towards aging, criminality, and public safety.

Kristen Choi

Kristen Choi

Dr. Kristen Choi (Kaiser Scholar) is a registered nurse (RN) who obtained her Bachelor of Science and PhD degrees in nursing from the University of Michigan in an accelerated BS-PhD program. Her doctoral education was supported by a National Research Service Award (F31) from the Eunice K. Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development at the National Institutes of Health and the Rita & Alex Hillman Foundation through the Hillman Scholars Program in Nursing Innovation. She studies trauma-informed service delivery, traumatic stress, and dissociative disorders among children who have experienced maltreatment, as well as other types of complex trauma and interpersonal violence. Dr. Choi has conducted quantitative and qualitative research studies in the US, Europe, and Africa on a variety of topics related to traumatic stress and service delivery for trauma survivors, including human trafficking, child abuse and neglect, and trauma-informed nursing care in perinatal settings. Her dissertation research project, “Service usage typologies among trauma-exposed children: The roles of PTSD and dissociation,” was conducted at the National Center for Child Traumatic Stress at the Duke University School of Medicine. She used a national clinical dataset from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network to identify patterns of service utilization across healthcare, mental health, school, juvenile justice, and social service sectors and to investigate co-occurring PTSD and dissociation symptoms among trauma-exposed adolescents.

Career Interests: Dr. Choi hopes to improve service delivery systems for survivors of trauma and to reduce interpersonal violence in communities by developing a long-term program of action-oriented research and advocating for policy change.

Research Interests: Dr. Choi is interested in health services research, policy, and system interventions to address interpersonal violence, child maltreatment trauma, and trauma-related mental illness.

Molly Easterlin

Molly Easterlin

Dr. Molly Easterlin (Cedars Sinai Health System Scholar) completed Pediatrics residency at the University of California, Los Angeles. She obtained her undergraduate degree from Cornell University, majoring in Biology and Society, and graduating summa cum laude and as a member of Phi Beta Kappa. While at Cornell she was also a 4-year member of the Cornell Women’s Varsity Soccer team. She earned her medical degree from the University of California, San Diego, where she ran a subspecialty free clinic and conducted research examining age differences in surgical outcomes that was supported by the National Institute on Aging.

Career Interests: She plans to pursue a career dedicated to improving the quality of pediatric medical care and the efficiency of the medical system. She hopes to become an agent of change to improve health care for pediatric patients, to encourage change in individual behavior to promote health throughout life, and to improve the practice, provision, and efficiency of care at the system level.

Research Interests: Her research interests include social and behavioral determinants of life-long health, long-term health implications of early exposures to adverse circumstances and risk, as well as large scale clinical-outcomes research, quality of care, and healthcare systems research. As a Scholar, she would like to further understand adverse childhood experiences, how behaviors and activities established at young ages affect long-term health in adulthood, and how adverse social circumstances can be overcome.

David Johnson

David Johnson

Dr. David Johnson (VA/UCLA Scholar) is a urologic oncology fellow at UCLA who completed urology residency at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He received his bachelor’s degree in economics at Duke University and his medical degree and master’s in public health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. While pursuing his MPH degree, Dr. Johnson established an ongoing research collaboration in Cuba to study ways to reduce the burden of prostate cancer mortality in a health system with limited resources. He also began work on innovative ways to improve the shared decision-making process for men with localized prostate cancer that he continued into residency. Dr. Johnson focused his research efforts during residency on studying quality and appropriateness of care, overtreatment and overdiagnosis, and surgical outcomes for patients with urologic malignancies. He was honored for his work during residency by receiving the UNC Lineberger Cancer Center’s John William Pope Clinical Fellow Award recognizing outstanding work in clinical cancer research, the UNC Lineberger Cancer Outcomes Research Travel Award, and the British Journal of Urology International’s Coffey-Krane Prize awarded to the urology trainee who contributed the best paper published in the journal in 2014-2015.

Career Interests: Dr. Johnson is interested in combining clinical care of patients with urologic malignancies with system-level redesign towards the “quadruple aim” of improving population health, controlling costs, enhancing the patient experience, and maximizing provider well-being.

Research Interests: As a Scholar, Dr. Johnson plans to continue working with physicians and public health officials in Cuba to implement and study population-level measures to reduce the mortality from prostate cancer. He is also interested in innovative delivery system redesign to better align patient values with treatment decisions and incentive high value, patient-centered care.

Shaw Natsui

Shaw Natsui

Dr. Shaw Natsui (UCLA CTSI Scholar) is an emergency medicine physician with an interest in urban health. He trained at the Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Natsui is a graduate of Harvard College, where he became deeply involved in local youth work and organizing in Boston, first through the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA), a student-run, community-based, nonprofit public service organization. He served as President of PBHA, which consists of more than 80 programs, involving 1,500 volunteers and serving 10,000 people in Greater Boston. After graduation, he worked briefly for Physicians for Human Rights on a campaign to reform the juvenile justice system on individual state levels. Dr. Natsui then worked at a local Boston community health center to develop and run multiple programs focused on peer leadership, youth development and youth-led organizing, violence prevention, obesity and diabetes prevention, and mental health intervention.

With the support of the Harvard Trustman Fellowship, Dr. Natsui spent the following 1.5 years in Lima, Peru, working on various projects related to community development and HIV/tuberculosis. He earned his medical degree from the University of Michigan, and obtained a Master of Public Administration at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he focused on urban and social policy, as a Fellow at the Taubman Center for State and Local Government. Dr. Natsui has additionally worked as a public health researcher in the Dominican Republic and as a clinician educator in Peru and Haiti.

During residency, his research focused on acute stroke care for non-English-preferring patients, predictive analytics and machine learning approaches to improving diagnosis, and the ED patient experience. He also helped organize a series of collaborative efforts to improve the ED care for vulnerable patients, particularly the homeless.

Career Interests: Dr. Natsui is interested in improving the quality of acute care delivery and access to care for vulnerable populations. He plans to focus on the implementation science of leveraging health services research to inform and lead multidisciplinary interventions and policies on the local, state, and national levels.

Research Interests: Dr. Natsui is interested in urban health, systems of care delivery, data science including predictive analytics and machine learning, and complex policy analysis.

Altaf Saadi

Altaf Saadi

Dr. Altaf Saadi (LAC DHS Scholar) is a neurology Chief Resident at the Partners Neurology Residency Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She graduated cum laude from Harvard Medical School, where she completed a thesis about preventive health practices among refugee women at a local Boston community health center. Her community involvements included leading a student group providing social services to refugee families and serving as a counselor for the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center. In recognition of her work, she received the Harvard Medical School Dean’s Community Service Award.

In residency, her interest in health equity has led her to work in resource-limited settings in Zambia, Tanzania, the Navajo Nation, and locally at the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless. Her passion for enhancing diversity in medicine led to important changes in her residency program, such as the creation of a diversity and inclusion certificate program and increased didactics on neurologic health disparities. Because of her leadership and community involvement, she was selected to participate in the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Palatucci Advocacy Leadership Forum and the Enhanced Residency Leadership Program at the AAN annual conference.

She received her undergraduate degree from Yale College, where she double majored in psychology and international studies. She received the Nakanishi Prize for enhancing race relations and the David Everett Chantler Award for high moral character and purpose.

Career Interests: Dr. Saadi believes in promoting social justice through equity in health care, and hopes to become a leader-advocate for marginalized communities in the United States and abroad, by combining her interests in health disparities, health services research, and implementation science. She is also interested in promoting diversity in medicine.

Research Interests: Dr. Saadi is interested in health services research that identifies and addresses challenges faced by low-income, minority, immigrant, refugee, and limited English proficient patients in obtaining neurological care. She hopes to translate clinical research into improved public health and healthcare delivery on the local, state, and national levels.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

Sae Takada

Sae Takada

Dr. Sae Takada (VA/UCLA Scholar) is an aspiring HIV primary care physician and researcher. She graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor’s degree in biochemical sciences, where she directed a student-run homeless shelter. Seeing the connection between urban poverty in the US and poverty abroad, she pursued a master’s degree in global health policy at the University of Tokyo, where she collaborated with the Laotian Ministry of Health in evaluating the implementation of a child health training program. Inspired to become a provider while pursuing research, she then obtained a combined MD-PhD degree at Harvard University. Her doctoral research focused on social networks and health-related stigma, with projects examining the impact of social ties on HIV stigma in agrarian Ugandan villages. She also served as teaching fellow for undergraduate courses in global health and medical sociology, for which she won teaching awards.

Career Interests: Sae plans to become a primary care physician specializing in the care of HIV-positive patients, while generating knowledge and designing interventions on community factors that influence health beliefs and behaviors.

Research Interests: Sae is interested in examining how health beliefs and behaviors are propagated through interpersonal relationships. She plans to use her interdisciplinary training to integrate quantitative methods with anthropological and historical perspectives to generate a complex understanding of social relationships and health. She ultimately hopes to understand how to leverage these social relationships to make communities healthier. ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

Tarak Trivedi

Tarak Trivedi

Dr. Tarak Trivedi (VA/UCLA Scholar) is an emergency medicine physician and researcher with a background in public health and epidemiology. He graduated summa cum laude from Wayne State University with an undergraduate degree in biology, followed by a medical school degree from the University of Chicago as a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. During medical school, Dr. Trivedi was a research fellow in applied epidemiology at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, focusing on the global and domestic burden of viral gastroenteritis. After medical school, he completed his residency training in emergency medicine at Highland Hospital, the safety-net hospital in Oakland, California. As a doctor in a high volume urban emergency department, he witnessed the acute and chronic health consequences of underlying social issues. He believes that by bringing more attention to these issues through research and data analysis, more accountability can be brought to the public and private agents capable of instituting change.

Career Interests: Dr. Trivedi is interested in a career in academic emergency medicine that combines the clinical care of socially disadvantaged patients with research and policy work that will give agency to emergency department providers to improve the lives of their most vulnerable patients.

Research Interests: Dr. Trivedi has a keen interest in better understanding and alleviating pressing problems faced by emergency room patients, such as interpersonal violence, substance abuse and addiction, and the severe societal deficit of acute psychiatric care in the United States. As a scholar, Dr. Trivedi plans to focus his research on these problems by studying the social epidemiology of emergency psychiatric evaluations, more commonly known as “involuntary holds.” ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

 
2018-20 Fellows

Etsemaye Agonafer

Etsemaye Agonafer, (UCLA NRSA/DOM Scholar) is the Chief Resident of Quality Improvement and Patient Safety at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She obtained her undergraduate degree in biology from the University of Southern California and a Masters of Public Health from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. She is a graduate of the David Geffen School of Medicine/Charles Drew University PRIME Program, where she was recognized with several awards, including the Dr. Charles R. Drew Award, Edith and Carol Lasky Memorial Award for Outstanding Research, and the Kaiser Permanente Oliver Goldsmith MD Award for the promotion and advancement of culturally responsive care. She received first place for her CDU/UCLA Medical Student Research Thesis, “Case Study: A Qualitative Analysis of the Rise and Fall of Martin Luther King-Drew Medical Center (KDMC).”

Career Interests: Dr. Agonafer is interested in healthcare delivery design and its impact on diverse disadvantaged populations, innovation that incorporates social determinants of health, and quality improvement for underserved populations.

Research Interests: Dr. Agonafer would like to research the impact of health care delivery systems on underserved communities’ health outcomes and patients’ perception of quality of care, and innovative care models to develop tools to guide the improvement of the delivery of their care.

Ish Bhalla

Ish Bhalla (Cedars Sinai Health System Scholar) is a Forensic Psychiatry Fellow at Yale. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Business Management from Case Western Reserve University and his medical school training at the University of Toledo College of Medicine. Prior to medical school, he worked in the management consulting industry at Accenture. At Yale, he has served on the Yale New Haven Hospital Graduate Medical Education Committee and led the Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience for first year medical students, for which he received the Yale University Department of Psychiatry Resident Teaching Award.

Career Interests: Dr. Bhalla is interested in psychiatric services, forensic psychiatry, and substance use disorders. He has focused on improving upon the way complex systems work, as well as understanding the framework that guides psychiatric clinical decision-making.

Research Interests: As a scholar, he would like to continue to explore the intricacies of the legal system as they pertain to patients with serious mental illness and to apply his previous experiences in business to healthcare to think broadly about the allocation of resources for patients with psychiatric problems.

Tiffany Kenison

Tiffany Kenison

Tiffany Kenison (VA/UCLA Scholar) is an internal medicine resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. She received her medical degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health, and a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School. Dr. Kenison has worked in the Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control at the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and as a leader for HIV/AIDS policy advocacy with the American Medical Student Association. She also previously served as a graduate researcher at the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, as well as an Editorial Assistant with the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African & African American Research and Harvard University.

Career Interests: Dr. Kenison is interested in a career in health policy, where she can conduct research as well as implement systems and policy-based change geared towards decreasing health disparities for diverse populations.

Research Interests: Dr. Kenison is interested in health policy, health disparities, and access to care. Her research has focused on medical education and delivering care to patients with limited English proficiency. As a Scholar, she will pursue research on social determinants of health for individuals with chronic diseases.

Charles Liu

Charles Liu

Charles Liu, (VA/UCLA Scholar) is a general surgery resident at Stanford. He obtained his undergraduate degree in molecular and cellular biology from Harvard University and his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. In medical school, he spent a year working for the Harvard Program in Global Surgery and Social Change in Mbarara, Uganda, where he expanded a surgical outcomes database at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital. He has received several recognitions for his work, including the 2016 Richard C. Cabot Prize for outstanding scholarly research and the 2015 Harvard Surgery Programs American College of Surgeons Medical Student Scholarship.

Career Interests: Dr. Liu hopes to establish a career in policy-relevant research, such as evaluating the impact of health insurance expansion and hospital consolidation on surgical outcomes and disparities. Clinically, his interested are in trauma and emergency general surgery as well as colorectal surgery.

Research Interests: As a Scholar, Dr. Liu he would like to explore the intersection of general surgery and health services research, with a focus on access to and outcomes of surgical care in underserved communities.

Alicia Morehead-Gee

Alicia Morehead-Gee

Alicia Morehead-Gee (Charles R. Drew University Scholar) is an internal medicine resident at UCSF. She obtained her undergraduate degree in human biology from Stanford University and her medical degree from the Charles Drew University-UCLA Medical Education Program, where she was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. While in medical school, she was awarded the CDU Dean’s Award for Excellence and the CDU Medical Student Research Thesis Program Award for Excellence in Research. Dr. Morehead-Gee is currently working on a project to understand factors associated with persistence of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use among HIV negative patients in San Francisco Department of Public Health clinics.

Career Interests: Dr. Morehead-Gee is interested in health disparities in PrEP use, health disparities in HIV treatment, and the intersection of incarceration and health.

Research Interests: As a Scholar, Dr. Morehead-Gee is interested in examining the rates of PrEP use among at-risk populations to address issues impacting PrEP initiation and improve future prevention efforts within public health systems.

Antonio Moya

Antonio Moya

Antonio Moya (LAC DHS Scholar) is a neurology resident at the New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell/Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He obtained his undergraduate degree in neuroscience from UCLA, an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health, and a medical degree from UCSF in the Program in Medical Education for Urban Underserved (PRIME-US). He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship in the Philippines to work on a project called, “Fighting the Philippine Stroke Epidemic: Acute Stroke Units and Telemedicine in Manila.” During medical school, he served as medical director for the UCSF Student-Run Clinic Mabuhay Center, and director of the UCSF Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association. At the 2016 Weill Cornell Neurology Resident Research Symposium, Dr. Moya won the award for best poster presentation.

Career Interests: Dr. Moya is interested in stroke prevention and treatment among underserved communities; telemedicine to facilitate neurology education, referrals, diagnostics, and treatment; and Asian Pacific Islander immigrant health disparities in neurology.

Research Interests: Dr. Moya is interested in using quantitative and qualitative research methods to understand disparities, in particular advocating for the disaggregation of data amongst Asian subgroups. He would also like to focus on how to leverage telemedicine as a multilingual platform to increase neurology care for immigrant, non-English speaking patients.

David Richards

David Richards

David L. Richards (UCLA CTSI Scholar) completed pediatrics residency at UCLA Mattel Children’s Hospital. He completed his undergraduate education at the University of Virginia, majoring in Biochemistry and Italian Language and Literature. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and was awarded “Highest Distinction” for his undergraduate thesis. David then joined Teach for America and spent three years as a chemistry teacher in the Washington DC Public School. Teaching helped him to better understand the effects of social determinants and adverse childhood experiences on education and health outcomes, and led him to get his medical degree from the University of Virginia School of Medicine. During his time in medical school, he was part of the Generalist Scholars Program, was the winner of the Department of Pediatrics award for student research, and was elected to the Gold Humanism Honor Society. He was also named a 2014 Jefferson Public Citizen Awardee, for which he was funded to mentor a group of undergraduate and nursing students to design, implement, and evaluate a community health worker training program in Limpopo, South Africa.

During pediatrics residency at UCLA, he was part of the community health track, and received the Alice Litman Moss Resident Award in recognition of outstanding clinical care, scholarship, and professionalism during residency.

Career Interests: Dr. Richards is interested in a career combining clinical practice with systems and quality improvement work, community-oriented research, and teaching. As a pediatrician, he hopes to continue providing comprehensive care to individual children, while implementing projects that improve health for vulnerable communities.

Research Interests: Dr. Richards’ research interests include school-based health centers, quality and systems improvement work, improving care access and delivery for vulnerable pediatrics populations.

Christopher Scannell

Christopher Scannell

Christopher Scannell (VA/UCLA Scholar) is an internal medicine resident at UCLA. He earned a PhD in Integrative Biology of Disease and an MD from the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. He previously served as Co-Director of the Health Care for All Campaign through the American Medical Student Association (AMSA), and as Director of the California Lobby Day campaign, advocating for the creation of a single-payer system in California. With AMSA, Dr. Scannell published a series of articles studying medical student attitudes towards advocacy-based training experiences, health insurance for the uninsured, and the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

Career Interests: Dr. Scannell is interested in pursuing a career in health care policy, with a focus on expansion of health insurance.

Research Interests: Dr. Scannell’s research interests are Medicaid expansion, single payer healthcare systems, and emergency room utilization.

Patricia Soderlund

Patricia Soderlund

Patricia Soderlund (LAC DMH Scholar) is a post-doctoral fellow at the UCLA School of Nursing. She is a certified Adult Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner and received her BA in Psychology at the College of St. Benedict, and BS in Nursing at St. Catherine University in Minnesota. Dr. Soderlund expanded her focus in psychology by receiving a Master of Science in mental health nursing from the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), and then continued with her PhD in Nursing from MUSC. As a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner, Dr. Soderlund managed a mental health outreach program for seniors with unidentified mental health disorders, and worked in outpatient psychiatric clinics in both Orange and Los Angeles Counties.

Career Interests: Dr. Soderlund’s career goal is to become a tenure-track professor engaged in research with underserved women of color in the U.S. who are at risk for comorbid physical and mental illness.

Research Interests: Dr. Soderlund’s training has focused on the use of both quantitative and qualitative methodologies in research. Her interests are focused on the use of healthcare services and interventions for underserved individuals with comorbid health problems and chronic disease. She is particularly interested in implementing culturally appropriate transmedia storytelling interventions.